Diabolical Masquerade—Ravendusk In My Heart (1996)

Diabolical Masquerade—Ravendusk In My Heart (1996)

Diabolical Masquerade—Ravendusk In My Heart (1996)

Details

Produced by Dan Swanö with Blackheim. Captured with analogue devices at Unisound Studio, September 1995. Mixed and engineered by Dan Swanö. Mastered by Peter In De Betou at The Cutting Room. All music, lyrics and concepts written between 1993-1995. Released on Adipocere Records, 1996; re-released on Peaceville Records, 2007.

The band split in September 2004.

Website | MySpace

Band

  • Blackheim—Vocals; electric and acoustic guitars; bass; keyboards/FX; drum programming
  • Dan Swanö—Drum programming and “heavy metal” vocals on track #5
  • The Spirits—Unearthly presence

Tracks

  1. The castle of Blackheim
  2. Blackheim’s quest to bring back the stolen autumn
  3. Beyond the spiritual moon
  4. The sphere in Blackheim’s shrine
  5. Under the banner of the sentinel
  6. Blackheim’s forest kept the seasons forever
  7. The darkblue seajourneys of the sentinel
  8. Blackheim’s hunt for nocturnal grace
  9. Ravendusk in my heart

Review

Until this album I had only 18 black metal albums in my CD collection (I still have a few more albums on cassette). I was hoping that I’d like this one, not least because I have another two Diabolical Masquerade albums to review after this.

The band essentially consists of two people Dan Swanö on drum programming and Blackheim on everything else. According to Encyclopaedia Metallum the band split in 2004 and despite various rumours about a comeback to date it is yet to happen.

This isn’t a black metal-by-numbers album. In the style of a Marks & Spencer’s advert. This isn’t just black metal, this is avant-garde, atmospheric black metal. And it’s good. It’s really good.

I say this quite a lot in these reviews. What I’m really looking for is something that is interesting, not just a solid wall of white noise with uncontrolled yelling. This album definitely ticks that particular box.

The album opener, “The castle of Blackheim”, begins as you might expect with a quietly atmospheric clean guitar then kicks into a fairly standard black metal style riff. But about three minutes in there’s a new melody that sounds like an electric saw, that makes a reappearance around 5′ 30″. It’s not much but darn! it’s effective.

With some songs there is an almost NWOBHM feel to parts, such as the instrumental “Beyond the spiritual moon” and the main riff in “Blackheim’s forest kept the season forever”. That song deserves special mention as it also features King Diamond-style vocals from Dan Swanö and an atonal guitar solo that could have been lifted from a Slayer album.

Another highlight for me is “Blackheim’s hunt for nocturnal grace” which opens nicely with a quietly picked bass arpeggio. The song then creeps along like a creature lurching between pools of light, trying to catch its step between one lamppost and the next. The deep throaty spoken words around five minutes in is rather special. But the sudden high frequency tone at 7′ 20″ is enough on some days to give me a crippling headache within a split second.

With five mentions of Blackheim in the song title, one does wonder whether Blackheim always speaks about Blackheim in the third person.

The closing track, the title track, “Ravendusk in my heart” has a strong bass dominance (think Megadeth “Dawn Patrol”) and a resurgence of deep, gruff spoken vocals.

Conclusion

Each album I put on during this project I do so with a sense of hope and anticipation. I wasn’t let down by this album. The more I’ve listened to it, the more I’ve enjoyed and the more subtleties I’ve been able to appreciate. This has been quite a pleasant surprise and a great find. A definite keeper.

Review score: 94%

Apocalyptica—Worlds Collide (2007)

Apocalyptica—Worlds Collide (2007)

Apocalyptica—Worlds Collide (2007)

Details

All tracks produced by Jacob Hellner. All tracks mixed by Stefan Glaumann at Toytown Studios, Stockholm. Recorded at Big Island Sound, Stockholm. Drums recorded at Swedish Radio Studio 4 by Ulf Kruckenberg. Additional cellos recorded at SUSI Studios, Finland. Released on 17 September 2007 on Sony BMG.

www.apocalyptica.com

Band

  • Eicca Toppinen—Cello
  • Paavo Lötjönen—Cello
  • Perttu Kivilaakso—Cello
  • Mikko Sirén—Drums

Tracks

  1. Worlds collide
  2. Grace (feat. Tomoyasu Hotei)
  3. I’m not Jesus (feat. Corey Taylor from Slipknot/Stone Sour)
  4. Ion
  5. Helden (feat. Till Lindemann from Rammstein; written by Bowie/Eno)
  6. Stroke
  7. Last hope (feat. Dave Lombardo from Slayer/Fantômas)
  8. I don’t care (feat. Adam Gontier from Three Days Grace)
  9. Burn
  10. S.O.S. (Anything but love) (feat. Cristina Scabbia from Lacuna Coil)
  11. Peace

Review

Another week, another Apocalyptica album. Sadly my last Apocalyptica review, and the newest album of theirs that I own.

This is the sixth studio album from the Finnish quartet (three cellos and drummer) released in 2007, and is another solid album—a mixture of instrumental tracks and songs featuring guest vocalists, full-out rocking pieces and more laid back ‘classical’-influenced numbers.

The album opens gently with the title track “Worlds collide”, a quiet throbbing bass note with a delicate melody drawn over the top of it, that soon opens up as drums kick in. Rock meets classical, drums meets cello—worlds collide indeed.

Japanese guitarist Tomoyasu Hotei joins the band for the next track “Grace”. To be honest, I can’t hear his guitar.

Next up vocalist Corey Taylor (Slipknot, Stone Sour) assures us that he’s not Jesus (“I’m not Jesus”).

When your world comes crashing down
I want to be there.
If God is looking down on me!
I’m not Jesus,
Jesus wasn’t there!

You confess it all away,
But it’s only shit to me
If God is looking down on me!
I’m not Jesus,
I will not forgive!

Sadly, I strongly suspect that this is about child abuse in the church. Horribly uncomfortable lyrics throughout.

“Ion” takes on an other worldly feel partly through the use of flanger effects, and then Till Lindemann from Rammstein guests on “Helden” (Heroes). According to Google Translate the song opens with these lyrics:

You, you could swim
Like dolphins, dolphins do it
Nobody gives us a chance
But we can triumph
Always and always
And we are then heroes
For one day…

It’s funny, you don’t often associate dolphins with metal! Mind you Rammstein would probably set fire to them!

The next guest musician is drummer Dave Lombardo (ex-Slayer, Grip Inc., Fantômas) who puts in a fabulous performance on “Last hope”. I could listen to his drumming all day.

“I don’t care” is a fragile song sung by Adam Gontier, formerly of Canadian alt. rock band Three Days Grace.

“Burn” is perhaps as close as you can get to all-out thrash metal on a cello; certainly the track opener. It’s a ferocious track, right from the start. I know how hard it can be to pick a guitar that fast, but how do they manage it with bows?! Astonishing.

Lacuna Coil’s Cristina Scabbia guests on penultimate track “S.O.S. (Anything but love)”. There is a warmth and depth to her voice but also a sharp clarity. A beautiful song.

The album closes with “Peace”, which like a few of their album closers has a reflective, lamentful feel.

Conclusion

Apocalyptica delivers yet another excellent album. The songwriting is clearly much stronger than Cult and they’ve brought in more guest musicians and vocalists than on Reflections and that really changes the dynamic of the album.

It’s interesting to hear how these vocalists influence the band. Till Lindemann makes them sound like Rammstein, Corey Taylor like Stone Sour, Cristina Scabbia like Lacuna Coil. And none these vocalists appear to have been involved in the writing process; I mean, Lindemann’s track was even written by David Bowie and Brian Eno.

This album didn’t quite get under my skin as much as Reflections Revised but it’s a good album none-the-less. If you like your metal played mostly on four-stringed instruments, and there are not too many all-bass metal bands around (now there’s an idea!), then definitely give this a listen.

Review score: 90%

Video

An uncomfortable video for an uncomfortable song, which reminds me a lot of Metallica’s video for “One”.

Audiopain—The Switch to Turn Off Mankind (2007)

Audiopain—The Switch to Turn Off Mankind (2007)

Audiopain—The Switch to Turn Off Mankind (2007)

Details

Recorded in Fias Co Prod Studios, May–July Year 21 by Audiopain. Mastered by Tom Flaske Kvalsvoll at Strype Audio. Cover art and layout by Espen Geitsund. Released on Vendlus Records 2007.

Audiopain on Encyclopaedia Metallum

Band

  • Plenum—Bass
  • Christian Holm—Drums
  • Sverre Dæhli—Guitars and vocals

Tracks

  1. Hellbound
  2. The switch to turn off mankind
  3. Holy toxic
  4. Termination fields
  5. Alliance
  6. Cobra dance

Review

Before I say anything else about this album, I have to say one thing: this CD has one of the most unreadable inlay booklets I’ve ever had to decypher! My study isn’t the brightest of rooms in the winter so when I flicked open the booklet I was surprised to see what essentially looked like six blank, black pages. It wasn’t until I angled the booklet towards my monitors that I saw there was something printed onto it in an ink so dark that, unless I’m very much mistaken, only guide-dogs will be able to read it.

So, on to the music. Audiopain are a modern, old school thrash band hailing from Oslo in a Norway. And I’m not kidding when I say ‘old school thrash’. This short (26 minutes 49 seconds) album reminds me of that burst of energy that was the emergence of thrash back in the early- to mid-80s: that fusion of the heaviness of metal and the brashness and energy of punk. There are elements of early Slayer in here, as well as other thrash stalwarts: Anthrax, Exodus, Kreator, Metallica, Sabbat, and Voivod.

I read one review which described this album as “the ultimate tranquillizer”, a watered down collection of “unintelligent riffs, annoying vocals, and nasty production”. Personally, I think that reviewer completely missed the charm of this album: it perfectly recreates that early thrash sound. This album doesn’t have the warm depth of a modern Andy Sneap-produced album, this has the scooped-mid of Kill ’em All (1983) or Show No Mercy (1983).

Opener ‘Hellbound’ is a blend of Slayer meets Metallica. The opening riff is like something from Reign in Blood (1986) fused with Kill ’em All (1983). Vocals are barked early Voivod-like.

The title track “The switch to turn off mankind” opens with a simple thrashing riff, more in keeping with Hell Awaits (1985). A couple of minutes in the pace slows down with an South of Heaven (1988) style riff.

Track three, “Holy toxic” is more of the same, to be honest. A few times I’ve played this album and I’ve not noticed that the previous track had ended and new one begun.

“Termination fields” has that classic metal dual-guitar intro: a simple riff that is emphasised on the fourth bar by drums and guitar: CHUG-chug CHUG-chug! This Judas Priest meets Metallica. It morphs into an Megadeth-meets-Exodus-like riff. And then more Voivod- or even Exodus-like vocals. It’s by far the best song on this short album.

“Alliance” brings out more Megadeth-style riffs, the influence of which spills over a little into the album closer “Cobra dance”. It’s another song that trundles along at one pace for a few minutes before slowing to a grind. Drums and Cliff Burton-style overdriven bass carve out a groove before Show No Mercy-style guitars weave a melody through it to the song’s conclusion.

Conclusion

This is an album of influences. In places more than a nod of the head to the titans and founders of thrash, but it doesn’t feel contrived and it all somehow works. This sounds like an album that comes from the heart where the band’s love of thrash just somehow spills out of them. Sure some of the riffs could be more interesting or more original but there’s a passion that is evident, almost tangible about the playing on this album. And that’s what I quite like about it, really.

This is a keeper for me. Not so much Audiopain as Audiopleasure.

Review score: 75%

Video

Paradise Lost—In Requiem (2007)

Paradise Lost—In Requiem (2007)

Paradise Lost—In Requiem (2007)

Details

From the liner notes: “In 2006 Paradise Lost signed a worldwide deal with Century Media Records and started working on something new that will soon become another classic: “In Requiem”. Produced by Rhys Fulber (Fear Factory) and mixed by Mike Frazer (AC/DC, Aerosmith, Metallica).

Band

  • Nick Holmes—Vocals
  • Greg Mackintosh—Lead guitar
  • Aaron Aedy—Rhythm guitar
  • Steve Edmondson—Bass
  • Jeff Singer—Drums

Tracks

  1. Never for the damned
  2. Ash & debris
  3. The enemy
  4. Praise lamented shade
  5. Requiem
  6. Unreachable
  7. Prelude to descent
  8. Fallen children
  9. Beneath black skies
  10. Sedative god
  11. Your own reality

Review

This is the first Paradise Lost album that I’ve listened to since 1991’s classic second studio album Gothic, a cassette that I literally wore out from listening to it over and over again, and on first listening I was really quite disappointed. “When did Paradise Lost become a pop band?!” I exclaimed on first listening.

In Requiem is studio album number eleven and, well, they’ve changed. Which isn’t surprising really given that 16 years and 8 studio albums separate the two. I had to remember that I’ve changed somewhat in that time too, from a naïve and timid undergraduate in 1991 to a married, ordained, father-of-three in 2007.

Maybe I needed to distance myself from the memories and emotions that I have wrapped up in Gothic and approach this as from essentially another band. I don’t have the benefit of hearing the path that Paradise Lost have taken in the intervening decade and a half.

The liner notes from this preview copy of the album quotes lead guitarist Greg Mackintosh talking about this album,

Musically: In Requiem is about finding the balance between brutality and empathy, between horror and beauty. Neither a celebration nor a lamentation. Simply the emotions that arise, being surrounded by life and death.

This is a solid album. It sounds like an eleventh album: more mature, more polished than Gothic.

It also feels less, well… gothic. It sounds brighter and more hopeful. To me it sits a lot closer to beauty than horror, using Macintosh’s comparison. It’s certainly very melodic, the kind of album that I could let my mum listen to quite easily (is that really the criteria for a great metal album?). It reminds me of the likes of Lacuna Coil, Evanescence, and Nightwish, Bands that probably list genre pioneers Paradise Lost themselves as an influence. As a result somehow this album sounds less distinctive and a little more generic.

The album opener “Never for the damned” begins slowly, a riff grows, like the sun dawning on an epic landscape. This is an album that sounds big; the songs feel as though they come from somewhere deeper, as though there is a history to them. Which fits with Nick Holmes’ writing style: he usually writes a lot more lyrics and then cuts them back to the key phrases to fit the melody, leaving them feel much more cryptic and epic.

It’s difficult for me at this point to pick out a stand-out track. I suspect that this is an album that will grow on me more as times goes on. For me this is one of those albums that works best as an album, listened from start to finish as one body of work. And that, for me is a good thing. I never really was a fan of singles for the sake of singles.

Conclusion

I have to admit that my initial impression was wrong. This is a great album. Whether it becomes regarded as “another classic” remains to be seen, but it probably deserves to be. There really isn’t one weak track on it.

I’m glad I stuck with it. It was one of those albums that I just kept coming back to. Just one more listen. And another and… ah! Now I get it. I like albums that you have to work at to get inside. Brilliant!

Review score: 90%

Video

Official video for the first single from this album, “The Enemy”. Not a particularly cheery video, to be honest.

Nick Holmes comments on the track: “Nothing to do with young guys in different uniforms killing each other. In this song I was thinking about different levels of hatred, and if a dislike for someone can actually be classed as hatred. Also how people can forgive people after unspeakable acts, yet other people become estranged over very small arguments.”

Raging Speedhorn—Before The Sea Was Built (2007)

Raging Speedhorn—Before The Sea Was Built (2007)

Raging Speedhorn—Before The Sea Was Built (2007)

Details

Recorded at Foel Studio, Llanfair Caereinon, North Wales during two weeks in April 2007. Mastered by Russ Russell at Loud as Feck Studios a few days later. Engineered and edited by Charlie Dorman. Assisted by Chris Fielding. Produced and mixed by Larry Hibbitt.

Released on 7 September 2007 on SPV Records.

Tracks

  1. Everything changes
  2. Before the sea was built
  3. Dignity stripper
  4. Mishima
  5. Last comet from nothingness
  6. Born to twist the knife
  7. Who will guard the guards?
  8. Too drunk to give a fuck
  9. Sound of waves
  10. Jump ship

Review

My two-and-a-half year old twin boys Reuben and Joshua were sitting on my desk last week when Reuben picked up a CD case. “What’s that?” he asked.

“It’s a CD,” I replied.

“What’s a CD?” asked his twin brother.

“It’s got music on it,” I explained.

“What music?” Reuben enquired.

“It’s by a band called Raging Speedhorn.”

“I LOVE Raging Speedhorn,” exclaimed Reuben.

“Me too,” chimed Joshua

Reuben again, “Raging Speedhorn is my favourite. Is it your favourite too?”

“Erm… no,” I began, “In fact, I’ve not listened to it yet. I need to listen to it and then review it for my 195 metal CDs blog.”

Obviously feeling that he’d not got his point across emphatically enough, Joshua repeated, “I like Raging Speedhorn.”

“Good,” I said,”I’ll bear that in mind when I’m reviewing it.”

An astute pair, I’d say. Having listened to them for the best part of two weeks now, I think I can confidently say “I like Raging Speedhorn” too.

The album builds quietly and steadily. Opening track “Everything Changes” kicks off with a really pretty strummed chord progression. Guitar, bass and drums until about 90 seconds in the guitars die away and then… drums, drums, and the vocals kick in.

It wasn’t until I’d listened to the track a couple of times that I looked up Wikipedia to find more about Raging Speedhorn. I had one question: how many vocalists do they have?!

And sure enough: two. That explains the almost conversational feel to some of their tracks. Like question and answer; preces and response.

It’s so good to hear such quality British metal, and from a band that doesn’t feel that it needs to restrict itself to a conventional four or five piece set-up. It’s odd because since I was eight years old I’ve sung in choirs. Small church choirs, larger regional choirs, and for eight years the National Youth Choir of Great Britain which numbered at times up to 140 singers. Odd then that I should consider it unusual that this band has more than one!

A shame that they are no more, however, having split in 2008.

I thought that the vocals would annoy me as I’m not really into that hardcore-inspired ‘shouting’ style of vocals. But somehow with the quality of this music and with two vocalists it just works. I could listen to it all day.

Conclusion

For me the stand-out tracks are the opener “Everything Changes” and track #7 “Who will guard the guards” which slows things down a bit and has a wonderful, twisting guitar riff.

Review score: 75%

Bonus

“Who will guard the guards” live at Glasgow Barfly 18 December 2006.

Chaos Blood—Fragments of a Shattered Skull (2007)

Chaos Blood—Fragments Of A Shattered Skull (2007)

Chaos Blood—Fragments Of A Shattered Skull (2007)

Details

Recorded, mixed and produced by Mark Mynett at Mynetaur Studios. Drums and vocals recorded by Pete Miles at Forge Hill. Mastered by John Blamire at Digital Audio Co. Released on Siege of Amida Records on 25 June 2007.

Tracks

  1. Bossanova Massacre
  2. Morbid Creation
  3. Raised By Wolves
  4. Shibiddy Bop
  5. Fragments Of A Shattered Skull
  6. Compulsive Urge
  7. Cranial Manouevre
  8. Hillbilly Acid Test
  9. Levitation Technique
  10. Redundant

Review

There are some albums that you just get into immediately; something about them just resonates with you. Others take a bit more work before you finally ‘get’ what it’s all about. Sometimes it’s just about putting in the hours and listening to it again and again, other times it’s about listening to the tracks out of order—which is what I needed to do for Mastodon’s last album— or simply listening to the album in a different context (listening in the car or on an MP3 player rather than a stereo).

It was while listening to this album one night in bed on my phone that it finally made a little more sense to me. Maybe this is a good lesson that I need to listen to each album on this project at least once out loud on my PC’s speakers and once on headphones before I make a judgement.

This is the first and only full-length album from now-disbanded Hampshire death metal/grindcore (deathcore?) unit Chaos Blood and it’s not a bad release, to be honest.

The album has some good riffs, breakdowns, and decent growling death-metal vocals that aren’t too monotonous. That said, the whole album does sound rather same-y. One song often blends into the next with little variation. A brutal onslaught of distorted guitars and drums interspersed with moments of genuine interest.

One exception is track three, “Raised by Wolves” which slows things down, kicking things off with a lamentful, descending riff for 30 seconds before unleashing a wall of noise that then morphs into a start-stop bouncing riff around 58 seconds in. It’s interesting, it’s even rather fun.

Another favourite is the title track, “Fragments of a Shattered Skull” which has a nice melodic guitar break about a minute into its 4:39 length which then twists into an almost acoustic jam, reminiscent of one of Soulfly’s self-titled offerings, before finishing off in the realms of Iron Maiden.

“Cranial Manouevre”, track 7, kicks off with an un-metal drum pattern and bass riff that reminds me a little of industrial band Circle of Dust. Around 54 seconds in Chaos Blood return to their roots with a bit of a deathcore rant. Throughout the rest of the song there are moments where they hint at taking another direction, but these turn out to be short breathers before continuing with the relentless, machine gun riffs.

The penultimate track “Levitation Technique” feels a bit more like a traditional death metal song with some imaginative solos around a third of the way in, and an opening riff that repeats a various points throughout the track. The second half of the song slows down into an almost industrial beat and then all of a sudden at 2 minutes 40 seconds the machine dies and the track ends. Brilliant!

In terms of lyrics… I have no idea! But on an album like this I always treat the vocals as another percussive instrument.

Conclusion

I must have listened to this album about ten times by now and I quite like it. Whether that’s just because I’ve been worn down by the barrage of blast beats or because I genuinely like it, I’m still not entirely sure.

It’s a shame that Chaos Blood split up after only one album. I’d have liked to have heard where they went next. They do the grindcore/deathcore thing very competently, but at times the playing-at-220-bpm parts feels like padding. For me, the real interest in this album lies in those moments when you can hear the band’s personalities and influences shining through: the slowed down parts, the stop-start riffs, the death metal solos, the bouncing riffs, and melodies.

Individually, a lot of the tracks are very good. But together, I still don’t quite understand the statement that is being made. I still haven’t fully experienced the journey. As an exercise, it would be interesting to reorder the tracks and see what a difference it makes. I suspect that this is much better album in the ‘wrong’ order.

Review score: 70%

Bonus

I couldn’t find any of the tracks I mentioned above on YouTube, here’s the only one I could find as part of a compilation.

Antigama — Resonance (2007)

Antigama — Resonance (2007)

Antigama — Resonance (2007)

Details

Recorded and mixed at Studio X, Olsztyn, Poland in December 2006. Recorded and mixed by Szymon Czech and mastered at Elephant Studio by Szymon Czech. All songs written by Antigama. Words and electronic sequences written by Lukasz Myszkowski. Released in May 2007 on Relapse Records.

Band

  • Lukasz Myszkowski (Vocals)
  • Krzysztof Bentkowski (Drums)
  • Sebastian Rokicki (Guitar)
  • Michał Pietrasik (Bass)

Tracks

  1. Pursuit
  2. Seismic report
  3. Ecstasy
  4. Neutral balance
  5. Order
  6. Pending
  7. Remembering nothing
  8. Barbapapex
  9. Psychonaut
  10. No
  11. After
  12. By and by
  13. Shymrok
  14. Types of waste
  15. Asylum
  16. Unreachable
  17. Stars

Review

A shorter review of this album might read something like: for fans of Order of the Leech-era Napalm Death hijacked by someone playing utterly random jazz (if that’s not a tautology) on an electric piano on track 8, and on guitar on track 13.

A longer review might just say the same thing but in a more drawn out way. So here goes…

When I first played this album this album I had two thoughts. The first was immediate relief that I’d found another album that I liked. The second was “Wow! They sound incredibly like Napalm Death”.

Of course, Napalm Death are the godfathers of grindcore so it is perhaps inevitable that you can hear an influence or two. But I’ve just been playing Antigama‘s Resonance and Napalm Death‘s Order of the Leech (2002) back to back, and on random play, and it’s remarkable just how hard it is to tell them apart.

If anything the production on Resonance is much better. It has a much crisper sound, it’s a less muddy sound.

Not everything is played at a hundred miles per hour, though. “Psychonaut” (track 9) is a heavy, slowed-down affair; almost doom metal in places. It doesn’t quite have the soul of Down but it’s getting there. It’s like the sound of a grindcore band being played deep underground (undergroundcore?).

And then there are two completely random sounding experimental tracks, “Barbapapex” at track 8 and “Shymrok” at track 13. “Barbapapex” reminds me of the silliness at the end of the Galactic Cowboys‘ song “Speak to Me” from their 1991 self-titled, debut album, where someone reads out a school dinner menu which ends, “…and for the Catholic students: FISH!”

“Shymrok” has a more Soulfly feel, or even like something from Andreas Kisser (Sepultura)’s solo album Hubris (2009).

Conclusion

For this project, each week I try to listen to my album-of-the-week at least once a day. My Last.fm stats are revealing:

  • Antigama — 45 tracks played
  • Napalm Death — 43 tracks played

I really like the early-/mid-2000s era Napalm Death so this hasn’t been a difficult week to listen. I now even have this album on my phone to listen to in bed and, again, that has to reveal something.

Review score: 85%

Bonus

Here’s the undergroundcore track 9: Psychonaut

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcAM2n2pDWc]